Sources


(Most of the information here has been adapted from the post Sources So Far . . .)
A→Z

  1. Bing.com

    Bing’s Birds Eye View utility enables axonometric views of the Zeckendorf Towers to confirm the details of internal floor layout.

  2. Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS)

    CBECS is conducted quadrennially by the Dept. of Energy’s Energy Information Administration. The most recently published data for public use is from a survey conducted in 2003 (Now: Late Summer, 2009). The data contains total average annual consumption per square foot of different types of commercial establishments, in various configurations (regional, mall vs. non-mall, etc.)

  3. City Environmental Quality Review Technical Manual (CEQR)

    The CEQR is compiled by the City of New York with multiple consulting firms contributing. It defines a standard set of environment quality considerations for the planning of new development. It provides a per week break down of the amount of solid waste produced by type of establishment

  4. The Comprehensive Solid Waste Management Plan for the City of New York (CSWMP)

    The New York City Department of Sanitation’s CSWMP from 2006 is the initial survey from which the CEQR table is derived. It also provides annual totals of solid waste produced per employee with a more detailed break down of business type.

  5. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    While being the source that administers both CBECS and RECS, the EIA also provides a widely referenced kid’s page. To our knowledge, this is the only online calculator that will convert units of energy to quantities of fuel.

  6. Google Maps

    The “My Maps” map tracing tools and the “Street View” operating mode are particularly helpful for measuring to obtain information on square footage and to confirm the number floors as well as the status and type of business on the ground floor.

    View Zeckendorf Towers in a larger map

  7. The New York City Department of Finance

    The New York City Department of Finance’s Tax Map utility provides information on building footprint dimensions (of use for determining total square footage) and city “Block” and “Lot” numbers (necessary to accurately identify a structure using BIS (below).

  8. The New York City Department of Buildings

    The New York City Department of Building’s Building Information System (BIS). Through this, we were able to obtain scanned “Certificates of Occupancy” and confirm the number of floors, and the uses zoned for each floor (note that the most recent available records were from 2008, found near the bottom of the linked page in section CO 115346).

  9. Real Estate Weekly

    Todd Maisel’s January 12, 2004 article indicates that Beth Israel Medical Center had purchase 300,000 square feet in the Zeckendorf Towers. This accounts for a majority of the square footage in the 1st 5 floors of commercial space in the building.

  10. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS)

    RECS is similar to CBECS, this survey is administered by the EIA and provides data on average energy consumption with regard to residential buildings. Most recent data from 2005.

  11. The United States Census Bureau

    Through the Bureau’s economic “fact-finder” website, the total number of people employed by “Supermarkets and other grocery (other than convenience stores)” is presented along with the total number of such establishments. Dividing the latter by the former will give you a number slightly larger, therefore, than the average number of people clerking a given store (to account for corporate management and administration). This information can be combined with solid waste production estimates in the CEQR and CSWMP to estimate the amount of trash produced by the Food Emporium, which occupies a significant part of the tower’s ground floor.

  12. Wikipedia

    The GameStop and Starbucks entries in Wikipedia, referencing for-profit data bases such as Hoovers.com, state the total number of franchises and total number of employees. Dividing the latter by the former will give you a number slightly larger, therefore, than the average number of people clerking a given store (to account for corporate management and administration). This information can be combined with solid waste production estimates in the CEQR and CSWMP to estimate the amount of trash produced by these establishments.